Journal article Open Access

DIFFERENT RISKS OF COMPLICATIONS OF PREGNANCY IN WOMEN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES

Dr. Husnain Hamza Tariq, Dr Alifa Sabir, Dr Dr Yusra Rashid

Introduction: Type 1 diabetes holding pregnant women are also associated with a highly increased risk of congenital malformations, neonatal morbidity, and obstetric complications. These highly adverse results are related to pre-conceptional care typically related to the glycaemic control level.

Aims and objectives: The basic aim of the study is to analyze different Risks of Complications of Pregnancy in Women with Type 1 Diabetes.

Material and methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in Islamic International Medical College during March 2020 to August 2020. Record gathered from 118 hospitals with the total number of 364 women stated for the study coordinator. As per database record, 11% (41 women) were excluded due to initial trimester spontaneous abortion as well as type 2 diabetes diagnosed in 16; 4% and follow up loss 2; 1%. We also stated the assessment of 323 pregnancies and all respondents gave written apprised consent. Entitled women completed questionnaires at inclusion (at the end of the initial trimester and around gestation of ten weeks) but during the trimester three (which is almost around 34 weeks).

Results: Maternal outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and those without the disease were evaluated in this study. No maternal mortality occurred within 30 days of delivery in 630 pregnancies with type 1 diabetes. However, pregnant women with type 1 diabetes were usually at a much higher risk of developing adverse maternal events during their pregnancy than women without type 1 diabetes, even after adjusting for age and infant sex or age, infant sex, place of residence, income level, occupation, calendar year, and Charlson comorbidity index. The risks of preeclampsia, eclampsia and cesarean delivery, increased in the type 1 diabetes cohort.

Conclusion: It is concluded type 1 diabetes remains a significant disease threatening pregnant women and their offspring. Clinicians should be aware of this clinical situation.

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