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An Analysis of Climate Forcings from the Central England Temperature (CET) Record

Alan D. Smith


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{
  "description": "<p>The Central England Temperature (CET) record is the world's longest instrument-based temperature record and covers the years 1659-present. The temperature variation of 0.8\u00b0C between the Maunder Sunspot Minimum in the late 17<sup>th</sup> Century and the beginning of the Industrial Revolution in the mid-late 18<sup>th</sup> Century can be explained by fluctuations in solar output\u00a0 (TSI) alone. Thereafter, approximately one third of the temperature increase to the present may be attributed to increases in atmospheric CO<sub>2</sub>, with the anthropogenic contribution to Global Warming/Climate Change up to the end of the 20<sup>th</sup> Century estimated at 0.4 to 0.5\u00b0C.</p>", 
  "license": "https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode", 
  "creator": [
    {
      "affiliation": "Department of Earth Sciences, University of Durham, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK.", 
      "@type": "Person", 
      "name": "Alan D. Smith"
    }
  ], 
  "headline": "An Analysis of Climate Forcings from the Central England Temperature (CET) Record", 
  "image": "https://zenodo.org/static/img/logos/zenodo-gradient-round.svg", 
  "datePublished": "2017-07-03", 
  "url": "https://zenodo.org/record/825998", 
  "keywords": [
    "Climate change", 
    "Central England Temperature record", 
    "solar forcing", 
    "oceanic oscillation", 
    "CO2"
  ], 
  "@context": "https://schema.org/", 
  "identifier": "https://doi.org/10.9734/BJECC/2017/34589", 
  "@id": "https://doi.org/10.9734/BJECC/2017/34589", 
  "@type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
  "name": "An Analysis of Climate Forcings from the Central England Temperature (CET) Record"
}
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