Journal article Open Access

DYNAMIC REVIEW OF PERFUME FROM ESSENTIAL OIL GERANIOL (PELARGONIUM GRAVEOLENS) AND GINGER (ZINGIBER OFFICINALE)

Dr. Md. Rageeb Md. Usman, Mr. Sajan Mangilal Pawara*


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    <subfield code="a">&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;Perfume is a mixture of fragrant essential oils or aroma compounds (fragrances), fixatives and solvents, usually in liquid form, used to give the human body, animals, food, objects, and living-spaces an agreeable scent.&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;

&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;The Egyptians developed aromatic oils and essences 5000 years ago. Great perfume lovers,&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;

&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;They used almond and rose oil, frankincense and myrrh, cedar, mimosa and lily, nutmeg, sweet balsam, cassia, benzoin and labdanum, galbanum and opopanax in such diverse preparations as aphrodisiacs, medicines, cosmetics and incense. In fact, the art of perfumery in Ancient Egypt was so sophisticated that when archaeologists opened Tutankhamen&amp;rsquo;s tomb in 1922 they discovered an ointment that was still fragrant! The study of fragrance, developed in the Nile Valley, was to inspire other ancient cultures. In Greece, athletes anointed their bodies with aromatic oils, and at banquets Romans refreshed themselves between courses with flower-scented water. It was the Persians who developed the use of exotic ingredients and the technique of extracting oils from flowers through distillation. This expertise was brought to Western Europe at the time of the Crusades. &lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;

&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;Keywords:&lt;/strong&gt; &lt;em&gt;Perfume,&lt;/em&gt; &lt;em&gt;Pelargonium Graveolens,&lt;/em&gt; &lt;em&gt;Zingiber officinale&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;</subfield>
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