Journal article Open Access

EVALUATION OF PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF GLYCACEMIA AS A PROGNOSTICATOR OF DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

Dr Tayyib Tariq, Umer Ali, Dr Umer Farooq


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  <dc:creator>Dr Tayyib Tariq, Umer Ali, Dr Umer Farooq</dc:creator>
  <dc:date>2021-01-16</dc:date>
  <dc:description>Objective: Nerve conduction studies (NCS) for measuring peripheral neuropathy are only less invasive and less subjective criteria. In diabetes, due to increased glucose penetration, it directly affects Schwann cells (or myelin) and Ranvier ganglia. In this observational study relationship present between glycemic level and the nerve conduction velocities, among type 2 diabetic patients is found, measuring the velocity of sensory nerve conduction of the ulnar nerves, femoral and motor ulnar and tibial nerves.Distal symmetrical peripheral polyneuropathy is the most common neuropathy in patients with diabetes.

Duration: From January 2019 to February 2020.

Method: Nerve conduction studies were conducted at the EMG department at the neurology department of Mayo Hospital Lahore. It has been estimated that fasting plasma glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels were estimated to find glycemic control.42 subjects having type 2 diabetes patients with onset of disease ≤ 5 years and an age range of 40-70 years were included by simple random selection.

Results: The motor nerve transmission rate of the ulnar nerve is significantly reduced in patients with diabetes (p &lt;0.05). Fasting plasma glucose and glycated hemoglobin are significantly increased in patients with type 2 diabetes (p &lt;0.001), with a significant inverse correlation of these glycemic parameters (p &lt;0.05) with sensory, raw and sensory transmission rates. Engine.The conduction velocity of the motor tibial nerve and the conduction velocity of the sensory nerve of the ulnar and femoral nerve were significantly reduced (p &lt;0.001).

Conclusion: This suggests the metabolic basis of the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Therefore, glycemic parameters have been shown to be important in predicting neuropathy and can therefore be used to assess other microvascular complications of diabetes.

Keywords: diabetic neuropathy, motor nerve conduction velocity, glycemic control, fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin.</dc:description>
  <dc:identifier>https://zenodo.org/record/4445120</dc:identifier>
  <dc:identifier>10.5281/zenodo.4445120</dc:identifier>
  <dc:identifier>oai:zenodo.org:4445120</dc:identifier>
  <dc:relation>doi:10.5281/zenodo.4445119</dc:relation>
  <dc:rights>info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess</dc:rights>
  <dc:rights>https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode</dc:rights>
  <dc:title>EVALUATION OF PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF GLYCACEMIA AS A PROGNOSTICATOR OF DIABETIC NEUROPATHY</dc:title>
  <dc:type>info:eu-repo/semantics/article</dc:type>
  <dc:type>publication-article</dc:type>
</oai_dc:dc>
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