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The pathways of humans and animals in the Early Neolithic Balkans: an archaeozoological perspective

Živaljević, Ivana; Dimitrijević, Vesna; Stefanović, Sofija


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  <identifier identifierType="DOI">10.5281/zenodo.4001655</identifier>
  <creators>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Živaljević, Ivana</creatorName>
      <givenName>Ivana</givenName>
      <familyName>Živaljević</familyName>
      <nameIdentifier nameIdentifierScheme="ORCID" schemeURI="http://orcid.org/">0000-0002-0873-7950</nameIdentifier>
      <affiliation>BioSense Institute, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Dimitrijević, Vesna</creatorName>
      <givenName>Vesna</givenName>
      <familyName>Dimitrijević</familyName>
      <nameIdentifier nameIdentifierScheme="ORCID" schemeURI="http://orcid.org/">0000-0001-8121-5457</nameIdentifier>
      <affiliation>BioSense Institute, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia; Laboratory for Bioarchaeology, Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Stefanović, Sofija</creatorName>
      <givenName>Sofija</givenName>
      <familyName>Stefanović</familyName>
      <nameIdentifier nameIdentifierScheme="ORCID" schemeURI="http://orcid.org/">0000-0001-7434-8788</nameIdentifier>
      <affiliation>BioSense Institute, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia; Laboratory for Bioarchaeology, Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia</affiliation>
    </creator>
  </creators>
  <titles>
    <title>The pathways of humans and animals in the Early Neolithic Balkans: an archaeozoological perspective</title>
  </titles>
  <publisher>Zenodo</publisher>
  <publicationYear>2020</publicationYear>
  <subjects>
    <subject>Early Neolithic, Balkans, archaeozoology, animal husbandry, regional differences</subject>
  </subjects>
  <dates>
    <date dateType="Issued">2020-08-19</date>
  </dates>
  <language>en</language>
  <resourceType resourceTypeGeneral="Text">Presentation</resourceType>
  <alternateIdentifiers>
    <alternateIdentifier alternateIdentifierType="url">https://zenodo.org/record/4001655</alternateIdentifier>
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    <relatedIdentifier relatedIdentifierType="DOI" relationType="IsVersionOf">10.5281/zenodo.4001654</relatedIdentifier>
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    <relatedIdentifier relatedIdentifierType="URL" relationType="IsPartOf">https://zenodo.org/communities/birth</relatedIdentifier>
  </relatedIdentifiers>
  <rightsList>
    <rights rightsURI="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode">Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International</rights>
    <rights rightsURI="info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess">Open Access</rights>
  </rightsList>
  <descriptions>
    <description descriptionType="Abstract">&lt;p&gt;Over the last couple of decades, extensive archaeozoological and aDNA studies have&amp;nbsp;securely placed the origin of animal domestication in the Middle East. From this area,&amp;nbsp;humans and domesticated animals (sheep, goat, cattle and pig) gradually spread to the&amp;nbsp;Balkans, and ultimately to the rest of Europe. Nevertheless, the faunal record from the&amp;nbsp;Early Neolithic (c. 6500‒5500 cal BC) sites in the Balkans indicates that this process had&amp;nbsp;been far from uniform. There seem to have been pronounced regional differences in&amp;nbsp;herding strategies, mainly between the southern parts of the Balkan peninsula, and its&amp;nbsp;central and northern parts, bordering with the Great Pannonian plain. In the former,&amp;nbsp;animal husbandry was mainly oriented towards caprovines, whereas in the latter, in&amp;nbsp;addition to sheep and goat, cattle husbandry played a more significant role. In this&amp;nbsp;paper, we present new results of the analysis of faunal assemblages from Early Neolithic&amp;nbsp;sites in Serbia and North Macedonia, the latter representing an area which had&lt;br&gt;
previously been insufficiently studied from an archaeozoological perspective. By&amp;nbsp;comparing taxonomic compositions and mortality profiles of domestic animals in the two&amp;nbsp;studied regions, we aim to provide additional insights into different animal husbandry&lt;br&gt;
practices, and look into possible reasons for this divergence &amp;ndash; adaptations to new&amp;nbsp;environments, cultural attitudes to various animals, and/or adherence to particular&amp;nbsp;traditions.&lt;/p&gt;</description>
  </descriptions>
  <fundingReferences>
    <fundingReference>
      <funderName>European Commission</funderName>
      <funderIdentifier funderIdentifierType="Crossref Funder ID">10.13039/501100000780</funderIdentifier>
      <awardNumber awardURI="info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/640557/">640557</awardNumber>
      <awardTitle>Births, mothers and babies: prehistoric fertility in the Balkans between 10000 – 5000 BC</awardTitle>
    </fundingReference>
  </fundingReferences>
</resource>
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