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Does stress eat away at you or make you eat? EMA measures of stress predict day to day food craving and perceived food intake as a function of trait stress-eating

Reichenberger, Julia; Pannicke, Björn; Arend, Ann-Kathrin; Petrowski, Katja; Blechert, Jens


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  <identifier identifierType="URL">https://zenodo.org/record/3946204</identifier>
  <creators>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Reichenberger, Julia</creatorName>
      <givenName>Julia</givenName>
      <familyName>Reichenberger</familyName>
      <nameIdentifier nameIdentifierScheme="ORCID" schemeURI="http://orcid.org/">0000-0003-4982-410X</nameIdentifier>
      <affiliation>Department of Psychology, Division of Health Psychology, Paris-Lodron-University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Pannicke, Björn</creatorName>
      <givenName>Björn</givenName>
      <familyName>Pannicke</familyName>
      <affiliation>Department of Psychology, Division of Health Psychology, Paris-Lodron-University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Arend, Ann-Kathrin</creatorName>
      <givenName>Ann-Kathrin</givenName>
      <familyName>Arend</familyName>
      <affiliation>Department of Psychology, Division of Health Psychology, Paris-Lodron-University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Petrowski, Katja</creatorName>
      <givenName>Katja</givenName>
      <familyName>Petrowski</familyName>
      <nameIdentifier nameIdentifierScheme="ORCID" schemeURI="http://orcid.org/">0000-0001-7297-2093</nameIdentifier>
      <affiliation>Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University Medicine Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Blechert, Jens</creatorName>
      <givenName>Jens</givenName>
      <familyName>Blechert</familyName>
      <nameIdentifier nameIdentifierScheme="ORCID" schemeURI="http://orcid.org/">0000-0002-3820-109X</nameIdentifier>
      <affiliation>Department of Psychology, Division of Health Psychology, Paris-Lodron-University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria</affiliation>
    </creator>
  </creators>
  <titles>
    <title>Does stress eat away at you or make you eat? EMA measures of stress predict day to day food craving and perceived food intake as a function of trait stress-eating</title>
  </titles>
  <publisher>Zenodo</publisher>
  <publicationYear>2020</publicationYear>
  <subjects>
    <subject>Ecological momentary assessment, eating behaviour, stress, negative affect, food craving</subject>
  </subjects>
  <dates>
    <date dateType="Issued">2020-06-24</date>
  </dates>
  <resourceType resourceTypeGeneral="Text">Journal article</resourceType>
  <alternateIdentifiers>
    <alternateIdentifier alternateIdentifierType="url">https://zenodo.org/record/3946204</alternateIdentifier>
  </alternateIdentifiers>
  <relatedIdentifiers>
    <relatedIdentifier relatedIdentifierType="DOI" relationType="IsIdenticalTo">10.1080/08870446.2020.1781122</relatedIdentifier>
  </relatedIdentifiers>
  <rightsList>
    <rights rightsURI="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode">Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International</rights>
    <rights rightsURI="info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess">Open Access</rights>
  </rightsList>
  <descriptions>
    <description descriptionType="Abstract">&lt;p&gt;Eating behaviour can be driven by non-homeostatic factors like stress. Both increased and decreased food intake in response to stress has been documented, but it has remained difficult to identify a trait that predicts who shows either pattern. Thus, we collected naturalistic data from Ecological Momentary Assessment in combination with the trait-level Salzburg Stress Eating Scale (SSES). In study 1, 97 individuals completed the SSES and 6 daily reports about stress, food craving and perceived food intake across 8&amp;thinsp;days, whereas in study 2, 83 diet-interested participants completed the same measures at 4 daily prompts across 14&amp;thinsp;days. Consistent across both studies, multilevel modelling revealed that participants with high SSES-scores showed relatively more positive intra-day stress-craving relationships than those with low SSES-scores. On the day level, stress also predicted perceived food intake as a function of SSES-scores. Controlling for negative affect did not alter results. Results support an individual difference model of stress-eating where decrease vs increase of eating depends on SSES-scores. In affected individuals stress influences simultaneous food craving but might exhibit cumulative or delayed effects on food intake. Furthermore, the SSES provides a valid instrument for identifying at risk individuals and for tailoring interventions.&lt;/p&gt;</description>
  </descriptions>
  <fundingReferences>
    <fundingReference>
      <funderName>European Commission</funderName>
      <funderIdentifier funderIdentifierType="Crossref Funder ID">10.13039/501100000780</funderIdentifier>
      <awardNumber awardURI="info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/639445/">639445</awardNumber>
      <awardTitle>Transdiagnostic views on eating disorders and obesity and new approaches for treatment</awardTitle>
    </fundingReference>
  </fundingReferences>
</resource>
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