Conference paper Open Access

RehabMove 2018: ACTIVITY AND MOBILITY USING TECHNOLOGY (AMOUNT) REHABILITATION TRIAL- DESCRIPTION OF COMMUNITY PHASE INTERVENTION

Hassett, L.M.; Van den Berg, M.E.L.; Weber, H.; Chagpar, S.; Wong, S.; Rabie, A.; Schurr, K.; McCluskey, M.A.; Lindsey, R.; Crotty, M.; Sherrington, C.


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  <identifier identifierType="DOI">10.5281/zenodo.1490149</identifier>
  <creators>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Hassett, L.M.</creatorName>
      <givenName>L.M.</givenName>
      <familyName>Hassett</familyName>
      <affiliation>School of Public Health/Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Van den Berg, M.E.L.</creatorName>
      <givenName>M.E.L.</givenName>
      <familyName>Van den Berg</familyName>
      <affiliation>Department of Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, ADELAIDE, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Weber, H.</creatorName>
      <givenName>H.</givenName>
      <familyName>Weber</familyName>
      <affiliation>Department of Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, ADELAIDE, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Chagpar, S.</creatorName>
      <givenName>S.</givenName>
      <familyName>Chagpar</familyName>
      <affiliation>School of Public Health, University of Sydney, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Wong, S.</creatorName>
      <givenName>S.</givenName>
      <familyName>Wong</familyName>
      <affiliation>South Western Sydney Local Health District, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Rabie, A.</creatorName>
      <givenName>A.</givenName>
      <familyName>Rabie</familyName>
      <affiliation>South Western Sydney Local Health District, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Schurr, K.</creatorName>
      <givenName>K.</givenName>
      <familyName>Schurr</familyName>
      <affiliation>South Western Sydney Local Health District, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>McCluskey, M.A.</creatorName>
      <givenName>M.A.</givenName>
      <familyName>McCluskey</familyName>
      <affiliation>Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Lindsey, R.</creatorName>
      <givenName>R.</givenName>
      <familyName>Lindsey</familyName>
      <affiliation>Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Crotty, M.</creatorName>
      <givenName>M.</givenName>
      <familyName>Crotty</familyName>
      <affiliation>Department of Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Flinders University, ADELAIDE, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Sherrington, C.</creatorName>
      <givenName>C.</givenName>
      <familyName>Sherrington</familyName>
      <affiliation>School of Public Health, University of Sydney, SYDNEY, Australia</affiliation>
    </creator>
  </creators>
  <titles>
    <title>RehabMove 2018: ACTIVITY AND MOBILITY USING TECHNOLOGY (AMOUNT) REHABILITATION TRIAL- DESCRIPTION OF COMMUNITY PHASE INTERVENTION</title>
  </titles>
  <publisher>Zenodo</publisher>
  <publicationYear>2018</publicationYear>
  <dates>
    <date dateType="Issued">2018-11-16</date>
  </dates>
  <language>en</language>
  <resourceType resourceTypeGeneral="Text">Conference paper</resourceType>
  <alternateIdentifiers>
    <alternateIdentifier alternateIdentifierType="url">https://zenodo.org/record/1490149</alternateIdentifier>
  </alternateIdentifiers>
  <relatedIdentifiers>
    <relatedIdentifier relatedIdentifierType="DOI" relationType="IsVersionOf">10.5281/zenodo.1490148</relatedIdentifier>
    <relatedIdentifier relatedIdentifierType="URL" relationType="IsPartOf">https://zenodo.org/communities/rehabmove2018</relatedIdentifier>
  </relatedIdentifiers>
  <rightsList>
    <rights rightsURI="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode">Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 International</rights>
    <rights rightsURI="info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess">Open Access</rights>
  </rightsList>
  <descriptions>
    <description descriptionType="Abstract">&lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;PURPOSE&lt;/strong&gt;: To describe technology use and physiotherapy support provided to participants to improve&lt;br&gt;
mobility and physical activity in the community phase of the AMOUNT trial.&lt;br&gt;
&lt;strong&gt;METHODS&lt;/strong&gt;: Process evaluation including participants (mean age 70 (SD18)) randomised to the&lt;br&gt;
intervention group (n=149). Intervention was additional to standard rehabilitation, prescribed using a&lt;br&gt;
protocol which matched games/exercises from eight technologies to the participant&amp;rsquo;s mobility limitations.&lt;br&gt;
Technologies included video and computer games/exercises, tablet applications and activity monitors.&lt;br&gt;
Participants were taught to use the technologies during inpatient rehabilitation and were then discharged&lt;br&gt;
home to use the technologies &amp;ge; 5 days a week for the remainder of the 6-month trial. Trial protocol required&lt;br&gt;
the physiotherapist to provide support every 1&amp;ndash;2 weeks using a health coaching approach. Intervention&lt;br&gt;
datasheets were audited to determine technology use and frequency, duration, mode and type of support&lt;br&gt;
provided.&lt;br&gt;
&lt;strong&gt;RESULTS&lt;/strong&gt;: Participants used an average of 2 (SD 1) technologies with 98% participants using an activity&lt;br&gt;
monitor. Physiotherapists had contact with participants on average 15 (SD 5) times (approximately every&lt;br&gt;
11 days), consisting of 6 (SD 3) home visits (46 min duration), 8 (SD 4) phone calls (8 min duration) and&lt;br&gt;
1 other (email, video conference, hospital) type of contact. Contact primarily incorporated health coaching&lt;br&gt;
(68%) with 8% for technology support. Topics discussed during health coaching included discussing data&lt;br&gt;
from prescribed technologies (79%), physical activity and mobility status (70%) and adherence (64%).&lt;br&gt;
&lt;strong&gt;CONCLUSIONS&lt;/strong&gt;: Technologies to support ongoing exercise are likely to become increasingly important&lt;br&gt;
as the proportion of older people in the population increases and rehabilitation resources become limited.&lt;br&gt;
A health coaching model to support technology use post hospitalisation is feasible. Some support can be&lt;br&gt;
provided remotely limiting the need for frequent home visits.&lt;/p&gt;</description>
  </descriptions>
</resource>
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