Journal article Open Access

Are there principles of grammatical change (A review article of David Lightfoot's book "The development of language")

Haspelmath, Martin


Citation Style Language JSON Export

{
  "publisher": "Zenodo", 
  "DOI": "10.5281/zenodo.1250543", 
  "container_title": "Journal of Linguistics", 
  "title": "Are there principles of grammatical change (A review article of David Lightfoot's book \"The development of language\")", 
  "issued": {
    "date-parts": [
      [
        1999, 
        11, 
        1
      ]
    ]
  }, 
  "abstract": "<p>This is a highly critical review of David Lightfoots 1999 book &quot;The development of language&quot;, which argues that there are no principles of grammatical change, so that &ldquo;historicist&rdquo; or deterministic approaches to diachronic change are misguided. Instead, Lightfoot argues that language change can only be understood by taking the perspective of the &ldquo;growth&rdquo; (i.e. acquisition) of an individual&rsquo;s biological grammar, which may end up with a different parameter setting from the parent&rsquo;s generation when the trigger experience changes. This review is very critical of most aspects of Lightfoot&#39;s theory: his strange notions of &ldquo;language&rdquo; and &ldquo;social grammar&rdquo;, his failure to say anything meaningful about &ldquo;nongrammatical changes&rdquo; (i.e. apparently the great majority of changes), his unconstrained theoretical innovation of &ldquo;diglossia&rdquo;, his complete misunderstanding of the neogrammarian revolution, and his irresponsible ignoring of much of contemporary work on language change.</p>", 
  "author": [
    {
      "family": "Haspelmath, Martin"
    }
  ], 
  "page": "579-595", 
  "volume": "35", 
  "type": "article-journal", 
  "id": "1250543"
}
205
108
views
downloads
All versions This version
Views 205206
Downloads 108109
Data volume 538.5 MB543.5 MB
Unique views 195196
Unique downloads 9394

Share

Cite as