Journal article Open Access

Structure and Function of Natural-Killer-Cell Receptors

Sun, Peter D.


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{
  "DOI": "10.1385/ir:27:2-3:539", 
  "author": [
    {
      "family": "Sun, Peter D."
    }
  ], 
  "issued": {
    "date-parts": [
      [
        2003, 
        2, 
        1
      ]
    ]
  }, 
  "abstract": "The function of natural-killer (NK) cells is modulated by the balance between a number of activating and inhibitory receptors. Killer immunoglobulinlike receptors (KIRs) are mostly inhibitory receptors. They play a critical role in recognizing self-class-I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and thus protect healthy host cells from NK-targeted lysis. In contrast, both NKG2D and CD16 are activating NK receptors that trigger the NK-cell lysis of various tumor and virally infected cells through either direct ligand engagement or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Through structural studies of members of these distinct receptor families, in particular, the structure and recognition between KIR2DL2 and HLA-Cw3, that between NKG2D and ULBP3, and that between CD16 and IgG Fc, considerable understandings have been achieved about their function and their ligand recognition.", 
  "title": "Structure and Function of Natural-Killer-Cell Receptors", 
  "type": "article-journal", 
  "id": "1236303"
}
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