Journal article Open Access

Vulcanology: Interaction between Kilauea and Mauna Loa

Miklius, Asta; Cervelli, Peter


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  <identifier identifierType="URL">https://zenodo.org/record/1233225</identifier>
  <creators>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Miklius, Asta</creatorName>
      <givenName>Asta</givenName>
      <familyName>Miklius</familyName>
    </creator>
    <creator>
      <creatorName>Cervelli, Peter</creatorName>
      <givenName>Peter</givenName>
      <familyName>Cervelli</familyName>
    </creator>
  </creators>
  <titles>
    <title>Vulcanology: Interaction between Kilauea and Mauna Loa</title>
  </titles>
  <publisher>Zenodo</publisher>
  <publicationYear>2003</publicationYear>
  <dates>
    <date dateType="Issued">2003-01-16</date>
  </dates>
  <resourceType resourceTypeGeneral="Text">Journal article</resourceType>
  <alternateIdentifiers>
    <alternateIdentifier alternateIdentifierType="url">https://zenodo.org/record/1233225</alternateIdentifier>
  </alternateIdentifiers>
  <relatedIdentifiers>
    <relatedIdentifier relatedIdentifierType="DOI" relationType="IsIdenticalTo">10.1038/421229a</relatedIdentifier>
  </relatedIdentifiers>
  <rightsList>
    <rights rightsURI="https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/legalcode">Creative Commons Zero v1.0 Universal</rights>
    <rights rightsURI="info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess">Open Access</rights>
  </rightsList>
  <descriptions>
    <description descriptionType="Abstract">After almost a decade of very slow rates of deformation, Mauna Loa in Hawaii, the largest volcano on Earth, began inflating in May 2002; at the same time, a high-volume effusive episode began at its neighbour Kilauea. We have found a correlation between these events at a very short timescale, detected by continuous deformation monitoring. This remarkable observation suggests that there is a crustal-level interaction between the magma systems of Mauna Loa and Kilauea, reviving a century-old controversy over the relationship between these two volcanoes on the basis of differences in their lava chemistry and in their patterns of eruptive behaviour1,2,3,4,5.</description>
  </descriptions>
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